The conference for all 11-19 mathematics teachers

2-4 July 2020
CASIO
University of Bath

Sessions

Scroll down to view more sessions. Click on the name of a session to see more details, book a place or remove an existing booking. There is no need to book for the plenaries.

Thursday 27 June Friday 28 June Saturday 30 June

Session A

11:15-12:15, Thursday 2 July

There are no sessions at this time.

Session B

13:15-14:15, Thursday 2 July

There are no sessions at this time.

Session C

14:30-15:30, Thursday 2 July

There are no sessions at this time.

Plenary

16:00-17:00, Thursday 2 July

Inclusion-exclusion in mathematics: who stays in, who falls out, why it happens, and what we could do about it - Dr Eugenia Cheng

The question of why women are under-represented in mathematics is complex and there are no simple answers, only many contributing factors. I will focus on character traits, and argue that if we focus on this rather than gender we can have a more productive and less divisive conversation. To try and focus on characters rather than genders I will introduce gender-neutral character adjectives "ingressive" and "congressive" as a new dimension to shift our focus away from masculine and feminine. I will share my experience of teaching congressive abstract mathematics to art students, in a congressive way, and the possible effects this could have for everyone in mathematics, not just women. I will present the field of Category Theory as a particularly congressive subject area, accessible to bright high school students, and contrast it with the types of math that are often used to push or stimulate those students. No prior knowledge will be needed.

Session D

17:15-18:15, Thursday 2 July

There are no sessions at this time.

Session E

09:00-10:00, Friday 3 July

There are no sessions at this time.

Plenary

10:30-11:30, Friday 3 July

Modelling evolution - Professor Alison Etheridge

In 1859, Charles Darwin published `On the Origin of the Species by Means of Natural Selection' and in 1866, Gregor Mendel published the paper that established the essentials of our modern understanding of inheritance. Although we now regard these two theories as inseparable, Mendel's work was largely forgotten until the beginning of the 20th Century when, ironically, it deepened divides in the academic community over the mechanism of evolution. Indeed by 1910, Mendelian genetics was a thriving field of research, but it was widely believed to be incompatible with Darwinian selection. When the two fields were finally reconciled, the mathematical sciences played a crucial role. In this talk we shall outline some of the rich interplay between population genetics and the mathematical sciences and explain how even rather simple mathematical models can have important implications for the ways in which we look at genetic data.

Session F

11:45-12:45, Friday 3 July

There are no sessions at this time.

Session G

14:00-15:00, Friday 3 July

There are no sessions at this time.

Session H

15:30-16:30, Friday 3 July

There are no sessions at this time.

Session I

09:00-10:00, Saturday 4 July

There are no sessions at this time.

Session J

10:15-11:15, Saturday 4 July

There are no sessions at this time.

Session K

11:45-12:45, Saturday 4 July

There are no sessions at this time.

Plenary

13:45-14:45, Saturday 4 July

How I wish I'd taught maths: 18 months on - Craig Barton

18 months since the release of my book, How I wish I'd taught maths, the time has come to reflect on some of the book's key ideas. Having had the pleasure of trying them with students all around the world, and watching hundreds of teachers put them to practice in their own classrooms, what ideas have had the biggest impact, and how have the ideas been improved? I have also had chance to reflect on some of the book's more controversial ideas, including Silent Teacher, my campaign to ban all classroom displays, and of course my (dangerous and clueless) take on variation theory. In this plenary I will delve into some of this and more.

Session L

15:00-16:00, Saturday 4 July

There are no sessions at this time.